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  • NASD is the largest self-regulatory organization (SRO) in the United States.

    Formerly known as the National Association of Securities Dealers, NASD regulates broker-dealer firms and licenses registered representatives - better known as stockbrokers - who make a business of trading securities.

    In addition, NASD regulates trading in stocks, mutual funds, variable annuities, corporate bonds, and futures and options contracts on securities, and acts as regulator for a number of securities exchanges, NASD also reviews materials that investment companies provide to their clients and prospective clients to ensure those materials comply with the relevant guidelines.

    Through its BrokerCheck database, NASD provides a resource for investors to check the credentials of people and firms with whom they're considering working. The NASD website also provides investor education and alerts on current issues of importance to investors.

    Finally, NASD also resolves disputes between broker-dealers and their clients, through either mediation or arbitration. NASD disciplines firms and individuals who violate the rules.

  • Browse Related Terms: agent, Broker, NASD, registered representative, Series 6, Series 63, Series 7, Suitability rules

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All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

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All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

Also listed in:

All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

Also listed in:

All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

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  • A negative, or inverted, yield curve results when the interest rate on short-term US Treasury issues is higher than the rate on on long-term Treasury bonds.

    You create the curve by plotting a graph with rate on the vertical axis and maturity date on the horizontal axis and connecting the dots. When the curve is negative the highest point is to the left.

    A positive yield curve - one that's higher on the right - results when the yield on long-term bonds is higher than the yield on the short-term bills. A level curve results when the rates are essentially the same.

    In most periods, the yield curve is positive because investors demand more for tying up their money for a longer period. But there are times, such as when interest rates seem to be on the upswing, that the pattern is reversed and the yield curve is negative.

  • Browse Related Terms: Level yield curve, Leveraged buyout, Negative yield curve, Positive yield curve, Variable rate, Yield Curve

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  • A negotiable contract is one whose terms can be altered by agreement between the parties to the contract.

    For example, when you negotiate the sale of your home, you might be willing to reduce the price, or you might be flexible about the closing date, generally in response to some concessions from the buyer.

    Similarly, the interest rate on your mortgage or the number of points you pay might be negotiable with your lender.

    A negotiable financial instrument or security is one that can be transferred easily from one party to another by endorsing and delivering the appropriate documentation.

    Stock certificates are negotiable, for example, requiring the owner simply to sign the back and deliver the document to an agent. A check is also negotiable, transferring money from the writer to the payee on the basis of a signature and an endorsement.

  • Browse Related Terms: Alteration, Draft, Escrow agent, Financial instrument, Forgery, Negotiable, Power of attorney, Return Item, Uniform Commercial Code (UCC)

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All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

All > Business > Finance > Personal Finance

  • The difference between the closing price of a stock, bond, or mutual fund, or the last price of a commodity contract, and the closing price on the previous day is reported as net change. It may also simply be referred to as change.

    When a stock has gained in value, the positive net change is expressed with a plus sign and a number, such as +0.50, meaning that the price was up 50 cents from the previous trading day.

    On days that a stock falls, the negative net change is expressed with a minus sign and a number, such as -1, meaning that the price was a dollar lower.

    You can find net change information in the financial pages of newspapers and on financial websites.

  • Browse Related Terms: Affinity fraud, Earnest Money, ex-dividend, Good faith deposit, Net change, Record date, Settlement date, Tick, Uptick

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