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  • Transparency is a measure of how much information you have about the markets where you invest, the corporations whose stocks or bonds you buy, or the mutual funds or other investments you select.

    For example, in order to achieve maximum transparency in US markets, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requires corporations to disclose all information that might have an impact on their financial status so that investors can make fully informed decisions.

    Real-time trading information, increasingly available to individuals as well as institutional investors, and linked pricing systems are other steps toward complete transparency.

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  • Treasury stock is stock that an issuing company repurchases from its shareholders.

    A company may buy back its stock for a number of reasons, ranging from preventing a hostile takeover to having shares available if employees exercise their stock options.

    It may also choose to resell the shares or use them to meet the demand for shares from holders of convertible securities. The company may choose to repurchase if it has cash available, as an alternative to investing it in expanding the business. Or it may issue bonds to raise the money it needs to repurchase, which changes the company's debt-to-equity ratio.

    In most cases, the company offers to pay a premium, or more than the market price, to build its cache of Treasury stock.

    Reducing the number of outstanding shares boosts the per-share value of the remaining shares and tends to increase the market price of the stock. That results, in part, because no dividends are paid on Treasury stock and it's not included in earnings-per-share calculations, boosting that ratio.

  • Browse Related Terms: Dilution, Preferred Stock, Rights offering, Scrip, Stub stock, Subscription price, Subscription right, Treasury stock, warrant

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  • A trust is a formal, legal arrangement by which legal title and management responsibility for a person's property is given to a fiduciary, known as the trustee. The person who creates the trust is known as the grantor, settlor or donor. The property put into the trust is called the corpus (the body, literally), trust res (the thing in trust, literally), trust fund, or trust estate. Those who are designated to receive income from or ultimately the corpus of the trust are known as beneficiaries. Generally, filers need to report holdings and income from any trust or estate in which they, their spouse or dependent children hold a vested beneficial interest in principal or income. Income received in the form of a distribution from a trust is required to be reported by the filer in actual amount if a filer does not have a beneficial interest and the trust holdings have not been individually reported. Distributions to spouses and dependent children are not required to be reported. Consult your Ethics Official for assistance in reporting trusts.

    US Army Financial Disclosure Management - Cite This Source - This Definition
  • When you create a trust, you transfer money or other assets to the trust.

    You give up ownership of those assets in order to accomplish a specific financial goal or goals, such as protecting assets from estate taxes, simplifying the transfer of property, or making provision for a minor or other dependents.

    When you establish the trust, you are the grantor, and the people or institutions you name to receive the trust assets at some point in the future are known as beneficiaries. You also designate a trustee or trustees, whose job is to manage the assets in the trust and distribute them according to the instructions you provide in the trust document.

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  • A trustee is a person or institution appointed to manage assets for someone else's benefit.

    For example, a trustee may be responsible for money you have transferred to a trust, or money in certain retirement accounts.

    Trustees are entitled to collect a fee for their work, often a percentage of the value of the amount in trust. In turn, they are responsible for managing the assets in the best interests of the beneficiary of the trust. That's known as fiduciary responsibility.

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