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All > Science > Weather

All > Science > Weather

Also listed in:

All > Science > Weather

Also listed in:

All > Science > Weather

Also listed in:

All > Science > Weather

All > Science > Weather

Also listed in:

All > Science > Weather

Also listed in:

All > Science > Weather

All > Science > Weather

  • (also called "Lid") A layer of relatively warm air aloft, usually several thousand feet above the ground, which suppresses or delays the development of thunderstorms. Air parcels rising into this layer become cooler than the surrounding air, which inhibits their ability to rise further and produce thunderstorms. As such, the cap often prevents or delays thunderstorm development even in the presence of extreme instability. However, if the cap is removed or weakened, then explosive thunderstorm development can occur.

    The cap is an important ingredient in most severe thunderstorm episodes, as it serves to separate warm, moist air below and cooler, drier air above. With the cap in place, air below it can continue to warm and/or moisten, thus increasing the amount of potential instability. Or, air above it can cool, which also increases potential instability. But without a cap, either process (warming/moistening at low levels or cooling aloft) results in a faster release of available instability - often before instability levels become large enough to support severe weather development.

    NOAA National Weather Service - Cite This Source - This Definition

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All > Science > Weather

All > Science > Weather

  • In hydrologic terms,

    1.The degree to which a material or object containing minute openings or passages, when immersed in a liquid, will draw the surface of the liquid above the hydrostatic level. Unless otherwise defined, the liquid is generally assumed to be water.

    2. The phenomenon by which water is held in interstices above the normal hydrostatic level, due to attraction between water molecules.

    NOAA National Weather Service - Cite This Source - This Definition

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  • In hydrologic terms, the soil area just above the water table where water can rise up slightly through the cohesive force of capillary action. This layer ranges in depth from a couple of inches, to a few feet, and it depends on the pore sizes of the materials. The capillary fringe is also called the capillary zone.

    NOAA National Weather Service - Cite This Source - This Definition

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All > Science > Weather

All > Science > Weather

Also listed in:

All > Science > Weather

All > Science > Weather

  • Alternate term for Cap; a layer of relatively warm air aloft, usually several thousand feet above the ground, which suppresses or delays the development of thunderstorms. Air parcels rising into this layer become cooler than the surrounding air, which inhibits their ability to rise further and produce thunderstorms. As such, the cap often prevents or delays thunderstorm development even in the presence of extreme instability. However, if the cap is removed or weakened, then explosive thunderstorm development can occur.

    The cap is an important ingredient in most severe thunderstorm episodes, as it serves to separate warm, moist air below and cooler, drier air above. With the cap in place, air below it can continue to warm and/or moisten, thus increasing the amount of potential instability. Or, air above it can cool, which also increases potential instability. But without a cap, either process (warming/moistening at low levels or cooling aloft) results in a faster release of available instability - often before instability levels become large enough to support severe weather development.

    NOAA National Weather Service - Cite This Source - This Definition

Also listed in:

All > Science > Weather

Also listed in:

All > Science > Weather

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