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  • A lease is a legal agreement that provides for the use of something - typically real estate or equipment - in exchange for payment.

    Once a lease is signed, its terms, such as the rent, cannot be changed unless both parties agree. A lease is usually legally binding, which means you are held to its terms until it expires. If you break a lease, you could be held liable in court.

  • A contract transferring the use of property or occupancy of land, space, structures, or equipment in consideration of a payment (e.g., rent).

    National Credit Union Administration - Cite This Source - This Definition

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  • Leverage is an investment technique in which you use a small amount of your own money to make an investment of much larger value. In that way, leverage gives you significant financial power.

    For example, if you borrow 90% of the cost of a home, you are using the leverage to buy a much more expensive property than you could have afforded by paying cash.

    If you sell the property for more than you borrowed, the profit is entirely yours. The reverse is also true. If you sell at a loss, the amount you borrowed is still due and the entire loss is yours.

    Buying stock on margin is a type of leverage, as is buying a futures or options contract.

    Leveraging can be risky if the underlying instrument doesn't perform as you anticipate. At the very least, you may lose your investment principal plus any money you borrowed to make the purchase.

    With some leveraged investments, you could be responsible for even larger losses if the value of the underlying product drops significantly.

  • Browse Related Terms: Bear spread, Bull spread, Delta, Exercise price, Hedging, Index option, Leverage, Options chain, Out-of-the-money, Straddle, Strangle, Underlying instrument, Underwater

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  • In personal finance, liabilities are the amounts you owe to creditors, or the people and organizations that lend you money. Typical liabilities include your mortgage, car and educational loans, and credit card debt.

    When you figure your net worth, you subtract your liabilities, or what you owe, from your assets. The result is your net worth, or the cash value of what you own.

    In business, liabilities refer to money a company owes its creditors and any claims against its assets.

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